CFP 2015 Tübingen Conference on Ethics: The Value of [In-]Security

2015 International Tübingen Conference on Ethics
The Value of [In-]Security
July 28-30, 2015
Call for Papers

The – perceived, expressed and sometimes imposed or insinuated – need for more and more security has been increasingly shaping the political and societal systems. It seems to have pervaded almost every sphere of life. New security technologies are developed and implemented for surveillance, identification, access, tracking, targeting and much more. The “quantified self” is framed by discourses that moralize practices like smoking and unhealthy eating, both under the auspices of avoiding risk and hence securing individual health as well as reducing societal costs. The digitalized life strives – as primary or secondary object – to eliminate known insecurities and at the same time creates new ones. And knowledge finds itself more often than not in the realm of (epistemic) security, insecurity, uncertainty and risk, where the uncertainty of knowledge or “truth” is the secure common ground.

The International Centre for Ethics (IZEW) is organizing an international conference on The Value of [In-]Security. The conference opens up the whole realm of “value”-related questions on (in)security. It will explore the explicit or implicit contradictions or dialectics between

  • dominant discourses which establish security as an important value (or precondition for developing and preserving values) and
  • less dominant discourses which deal with the complexity of „security“, its possible side effects and the question whether „insecurity“ could be considered a value (or precondition for developing and preserving values).

The conference will investigate these contradictory lines of thought and fields of practices. It aims at an ethical analysis of the value(s) of both insecurity as well as security in different contexts and will address, e.g., the following questions:

  • What role does security and insecurity play in fields like education, technology, crime prevention and counter terrorism, media, food, health, and many more? What are the driving forces and the respective consequences of securitization processes? Which “security moralities” can be found with different actor constellations and what could be an adequate ethical analysis?
  • How are concepts of security directed against harmful interventions from outside (in the
    extreme: terror attacks) and concepts of security assuring the stability of social, economic
    or status needs intertwined?
  • What are the blind spots in current visions of security?
  • Has security become a fetish in already very secure societies? If yes: What are the
    political, societal, technological, economical or ethical implications?
  • What is the value of security in situations and societies which are blatantly insecure?
  • What is the role of security for individuals or groups who are discriminated against and
    thus in special need of security while at the same time some of them are perceived as
    security risks?
  • Can insecurity be considered a value? How do the meanings and practices of security
    change if security is perceived in opposition to concepts like vulnerability, uncertainty,
    exposure, openness?
  • What are the – epistemic, cultural, societal and moral – values of security?
  • What is the role of application-oriented ethics in defining the need for security and insecurity?

We are asking scholars from all disciplines interested in the Ethics of [In-]Security to suggest
themes. Please submit an abstract of max. 400 words until January 15, 2015, to
ethics2015@izew.uni-tuebingen.de

Conference language is English.

A peer-reviewed publication of conference contributions is planned.

The values of (in)security shall be explored employing different formats of interaction: We will try
to bring the conference not only to the lecture hall but also into the public space the city of
Tübingen offers: There could be the chance to lecture about insecurity while punting on the river
Neckar. Or to think about security in Hölderlin’s tower. Further ideas and suggestions for
unusual formats are welcome.

We have a small budget for travel grants especially for doctoral students and early career
researchers. Please indicate in case of necessity.

Pre-conference “Festakt” on July 27, 2015: 25th anniversary of the Tübingen Ethics Centre
On the occasion of the 25th anniversary of the Ethics Centre, there will be a ceremonial act in
German language on July 27, 2015. Speaker will be Gesine Schwan, political science professor
and former president of the Viadrina European University, Frankfurt/Oder. Conference guests
are very welcome to arrive earlier and celebrate with us.

CFP Edinburgh Conference in Critical Migration and Border Studies

Call for a Collective Debate and Intervention

Politics, Practices, and Discourses of Mobility

  First Edinburgh Conference in Critical Migration and Border Studies

08-10/01/2015

  The movement of people has long been a contentious socio-political phenomenon that also currently dominates newspaper headlines and political debates in the UK, Europe, and beyond. The flow of people on the move becomes increasingly directed, monitored, and controlled by complex networks of governmental actors, an emerging regime that overflows traditional conceptions of nation-states and their organisation. Migrations highlight and often problematise the functioning of the international sovereign state system and broach diverse questions concerning (the limits of) democratic inclusion and rights, race, and international (labour) relations. In response to the war in Syria, leading to one of the most severe refugee crises in the last decades, the UK as well as the EU have closed their doors to those on the move, fleeing violence and persecution. Reports on deadly tragedies occurring along the external borders of the EU have become commonplace phenomena. At the same time, migrations within the EU are met with increasing opposition: those who leave certain EU member states and move toward Western European countries experience increasing political rejection, social antagonism, and racial discrimination.

How can we understand the discourses that portray people on the move primarily as security concerns or ‘welfare scroungers’ who would threaten the economic and cultural well-being of nation-states and their populations? How are borders practiced as political technologies, keeping some (temporarily) in and others out? How important is race in contemporary migration governance, and in questions of citizenship? How do such discourses, and the practices of surveillance they engender, operate within the university as an institution? And, is it not time to go beyond a discourse that regards migration first and foremost as a political problem that needs to be governed? Is it, instead, possible to regard migration as a social force – beyond the demands of the labour market and citizenship – that creates and enacts ‘new worlds’ with the potential for realising social justice?

In this two-day workshop, we will explore these and other questions through collective debates in an open format. Instead of following the individualistic logic so prevalent in academic settings today, we hope to engage in collaborative thought processes and reflections, and to identify common themes, questions, and concerns that unite our various works. Rather than preparing paper-based individual presentations, PhD students and early career researchers will be invited to come together in small groups to provide short inputs and stimulate collective discussion. Following up on successes with this format at a previous workshop in Leicester, this event seeks to further promote and extend MobLab, an emerging network of critical researchers working at the intersections of activism and academic knowledge production in the field of migration, mobility, and border studies.

Possible themes to discuss include (but are by no means limited to):

  • What boundaries exist between academia and activism? How can (or should?) we overcome them?
  • How can we intervene in the politics of migration from a critical perspective?
  • How are we teaching migration and mobility, and how can we encourage critical reflections on these topics in the classroom?
  • How can we deal with institutional requirements in higher education, such as the monitoring of students for border control purposes?
  • How do pressures within academia – such as the need to publish in particular outlets, to excel individually, to obtain research funding – affect our ability to produce critical work? What coping strategies can we develop?

If you are interested in participating in this event, please send a short abstract of the concrete problematic you would like to discuss, and a brief biographical note reflecting your interests and background by 26/11/2014 to

Nina Perkowski s1252190@sms.ed.ac.uk

and Veit Schwab V.Schwab@warwick.ac.uk

This will allow us to group people according to their interests. If you have further questions regarding the format, the workshop, or the network, don’t hesitate to send us an email as well.

Applications from persons without formal academic affiliation are highly encouraged!

A limited number of travel grants is available. Please indicate in your application whether you will need financial support for travel and/or accommodation in Edinburgh.

Call for Paper Sessions: COST Action IS1101 Climate Change and Migration

International Conference – 2nd Call for Paper Sessions – COST Action IS1101 Climate Change and Migration

Human Migration and the Environment: Futures, Politics, Invention

28 June-1 July 2015, Durham University

Confirmed Keynote Speakers:

Professor David Held (Durham University)

Professor Wendy Brown (UC, Berkeley)

Professor Claire Colebrook (Penn State)

Professor Walter Kälin (University of Bern)

Conference website: http://dogweb.dur.ac.uk/costconference

New submission deadline: 12 December 2014

Submission Information: Submit paper session proposals to climate.migration@durham.ac.uk with the subject line ‘Durham Conference’.

Conference Abstract: Human migration and the environment are two of the most pressing issues of our times. But what is stake when these two phenomena are articulated as a singular relation? By asking this and many other questions, this conference provides a multidisciplinary forum for scholars, policymakers, practitioners and artists to chart out the next generation of research on human migration and the environment. The aim of the conference is to expand the debate on human migration and the environment beyond its current configuration as a problem of causation, law and policy towards a more pluralist debate that acknowledges the multidimensional nature of environmental change and migration. The conference subthemes –  ‘futures’, ‘politics’ and ‘invention’ – will consider issues of knowledge, power and innovation  the context of human migration and environmental change. The conference should appeal to social scientists, humanities and legal scholars as well as to scientists committed to working with and within the social sciences, humanities and law.

Sponsor:  COST Action IS1101 Climate change and migration: knowledge, law and policy, and theory

Conference Organisers:

Dr Andrew Baldwin (Durham University) w.a.baldwin@durham.ac.uk

Dr Francois Gemenne (University of Liège / University of Versailles Saint-Quentin) francois.gemenne@sciencespo.fr

Dr Dimitra Manou (Aristotle University of Thessaloniki) dimitra.b.manou@gmail.com

Call for Papers: 2015 International Tübingen Conference on Ethics

2015 International Tübingen Conference on Ethics
The Value of [In-]Security
July 28-30, 2015
Call for Papers

The – perceived, expressed and sometimes imposed or insinuated – need for more and more security has been increasingly shaping the political and societal systems. It seems to have pervaded almost every sphere of life. New security technologies are developed and implemented for surveillance, identification, access, tracking, targeting and much more. The “quantified self” is framed by discourses that moralize practices like smoking and unhealthy eating, both under the auspices of avoiding risk and hence securing individual health as well as reducing societal costs. The digitalized life strives – as primary or secondary object – to eliminate known insecurities and at the same time creates new ones. And knowledge finds itself more often than not in the realm of (epistemic) security, insecurity, uncertainty and risk, where the uncertainty of knowledge or “truth” is the secure common ground.

The International Centre for Ethics (IZEW) is organizing an international conference on The Value of [In-]Security. The conference opens up the whole realm of “value”-related questions on (in)security. It will explore the explicit or implicit contradictions or dialectics between

  • dominant discourses which establish security as an important value (or precondition for developing and preserving values) and
  • less dominant discourses which deal with the complexity of „security“, its possible side effects and the question whether „insecurity“ could be considered a value (or precondition for developing and preserving values).

The conference will investigate these contradictory lines of thought and fields of practices. It aims at an ethical analysis of the value(s) of both insecurity as well as security in different contexts and will address, e.g., the following questions:

  • What role does security and insecurity play in fields like education, technology, crime prevention and counter terrorism, media, food, health, and many more? What are the driving forces and the respective consequences of securitization processes? Which “security moralities” can be found with different actor constellations and what could be an adequate ethical analysis?
  • How are concepts of security directed against harmful interventions from outside (in the extreme: terror attacks) and concepts of security assuring the stability of social, economic or status needs intertwined?
  • What are the blind spots in current visions of security?
  • Has security become a fetish in already very secure societies? If yes: What are the political, societal, technological, economical or ethical implications?
  • What is the value of security in situations and societies which are blatantly insecure?
  • What is the role of security for individuals or groups who are discriminated against and thus in special need of security while at the same time some of them are perceived as security risks?
  • Can insecurity be considered a value? How do the meanings and practices of security change if security is perceived in opposition to concepts like vulnerability, uncertainty, exposure, openness?
  • What are the – epistemic, cultural, societal and moral – values of security?

What is the role of application-oriented ethics in defining the need for security and insecurity?
We are asking scholars from all disciplines interested in the Ethics of [In-]Security to suggest themes. Please submit an abstract of max. 400 words until January 15, 2015, to
ethics2015@izew.uni-tuebingen.de

Conference language is English.
A peer-reviewed publication of conference contributions is planned.

The values of (in)security shall be explored employing different formats of interaction: We will try to bring the conference not only to the lecture hall but also into the public space the city of Tübingen offers: There could be the chance to lecture about insecurity while punting on the river Neckar. Or to think about security in Hölderlin’s tower. Further ideas and suggestions for unusual formats are welcome.

We have a small budget for travel grants especially for doctoral students and early career researchers. Please indicate in case of necessity.

Pre-conference “Festakt” on July 27, 2015: 25th anniversary of the Tübingen Ethics Centre
On the occasion of the 25th anniversary of the Ethics Centre, there will be a ceremonial act in German language on July 27, 2015. Speaker will be Gesine Schwan, political science professor and former president of the Viadrina European University, Frankfurt/Oder. Conference guests are very welcome to arrive earlier and celebrate with us.

http://www.uni-tuebingen.de/de/57843